Spring2018.CSCI392CourseSyllabus History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output

Added lines 107-108:

Here are [[https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wvwTc2-UodHran7dZW0vFXvJwqOy6-7-LhDx_pCl3yE/edit | biographical sketches]] for the external speakers.
Changed line 78 from:
* February 12: Dirk Schlingmann – Mathematics and Music, University of South Carolina Upstate
to:
* February 12: Brent Munsell – Machine Learning and Biomedical Image Analysis Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
Changed line 81 from:
* February 19: William Bares – Virtual Production Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
to:
* February 19: Dirk Schlingmann – Mathematics and Music, University of South Carolina Upstate
Changed line 96 from:
* April 2: Brent Munsell – Machine Learning and Biomedical Image Analysis Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
to:
* April 2: William Bares – Virtual Production Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
Changed lines 78-80 from:
* February 12: Brent Munsell – Machine Learning and Biomedical Image Analysis Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
** Tyler Newman, Liming Ding, Sam Word
to:
* February 12: Dirk Schlingmann – Mathematics and Music, University of South Carolina Upstate
** Athina Lambrinos, Jo Culbertson, Justin Hull
Changed lines 96-97 from:
* April 2: Bill Manaris, Computer Music and Interaction, The College of Charleston
** Athina Lambrinos
, Jo Culbertson, Justin Hull
to:
* April 2: Brent Munsell – Machine Learning and Biomedical Image Analysis Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
** Tyler Newman, Liming Ding, Sam Word
Changed lines 78-81 from:
* February 12: William Bares – Virtual Production Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
to:
* February 12: Brent Munsell – Machine Learning and Biomedical Image Analysis Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
** Tyler Newman, Liming Ding, Sam Word

* February 19
: William Bares – Virtual Production Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
Deleted lines 82-84:

* February 19: Brent Munsell – Machine Learning and Biomedical Image Analysis Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
** Tyler Newman, Liming Ding, Sam Word
Changed line 75 from:
* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
to:
* February 5: Tobias Kohn – Hidden Information in Python Code - How to Compile and Analyze Python Programs, University of Oxford
Changed lines 84-85 from:
* February 26: Aspen Olmsted – Computer Science Graduate School, The University of Charleston; '''Test on ACM Code of Ethics'''
to:
* February 26: Aspen Olmsted – Computer Science Graduate School, The University of Charleston;
** February 28:
'''Test on ACM Code of Ethics'''
Changed line 70 from:
* January 22: Anthony Leclerc – A Parallel Memory-efficient Epistemic Logic Program Solver: Harder, Better, Faster; Ayman Hajja – Hospital Readmissions and Other Data Mining Applications in Healthcare, The College of Charleston
to:
* January 22: Anthony Leclerc – A Parallel Memory-efficient Epistemic Logic Program Solver: Harder, Better, Faster / Ayman Hajja – Hospital Readmissions and Other Data Mining Applications in Healthcare, The College of Charleston
Changed line 70 from:
* January 22: Anthony Leclerc – ELP Solver; Ayman Hajja – Healthcare informatics, The College of Charleston
to:
* January 22: Anthony Leclerc – A Parallel Memory-efficient Epistemic Logic Program Solver: Harder, Better, Faster; Ayman Hajja – Hospital Readmissions and Other Data Mining Applications in Healthcare, The College of Charleston
Changed lines 73-75 from:
* January 29: Jim Bowring – CIRDLES Lab, The College of Charleston

* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science
Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* January 29: Jim Bowring – Cyber Infrastructure Research & Development Lab for the Earth Sciences (CIRDLES) Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston

* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science Research Lab Projects
, The College of Charleston
Changed line 78 from:
* February 12: William Bares – MoCap Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* February 12: William Bares – Virtual Production Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
Changed line 81 from:
* February 19: Brent Munsell – ML/Image Analysis Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* February 19: Brent Munsell – Machine Learning and Biomedical Image Analysis Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
Changed line 86 from:
* March 5: Xenia Mountrouidou – Cyber Security Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* March 5: Xenia Mountrouidou – Cyber Security Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
Changed line 89 from:
* March 12: Malek Ben Salem – Cyber Security, Accenture Labs, Arlington, VA
to:
* March 12: Malek Ben Salem – Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security, Accenture Labs, Arlington, VA
Changed line 95 from:
* April 2: Bill Manaris, Computer music and interaction, Acoustics and Music Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* April 2: Bill Manaris, Computer Music and Interaction, The College of Charleston
Changed line 98 from:
* April 9: Annie N. Simpson and Katie Kirchoff, Healthcare Leadership and Management, MUSC
to:
* April 9: Annie N. Simpson and Katie Kirchoff, Generating Evidence to Drive Healthcare Decision-Making, MUSC
Changed line 101 from:
* April 16: Panayiotis Kokoras, Experimental Music and Intermedia, University of North Texas
to:
* April 16: Panayiotis Kokoras, From Perception to Sensation: Observer, Sound, Time, University of North Texas
Changed line 104 from:
* April 23: Sebastian van Delden, Robotics Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* April 23: Sebastian van Delden, Robotics Research Lab Projects, The College of Charleston
Changed line 76 from:
** Andrew Miller, Omer Omer
to:
** Andrew Miller, Omer Omer, Jack Addison
Changed lines 76-77 from:
** Andrew Miller
to:
** Andrew Miller, Omer Omer
Changed line 79 from:
** Doug Corrigan
to:
** Doug Corrigan, Maddie Maniaci, Jonathan Rabiu
Changed line 68 from:
* January 17: Presentation and discussion on readings; Topic/presentation day selection
to:
* January 17: Presentation and discussion on ACM Code of Ethics
Changed lines 71-72 from:
** Austin Hunt, Jayse White
to:
** Austin Hunt, Jayse White, Phill Byrd
Changed lines 75-76 from:
* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science Lab, The College of Charleston; '''Test on ACM Code of Ethics'''
to:
* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science Lab, The College of Charleston
** Andrew Miller
Changed lines 82-85 from:
** Tyler Newman, Liming Ding

* February
26: Aspen Olmsted – Computer Science Graduate School, The University of Charleston
to:
** Tyler Newman, Liming Ding, Sam Word

* February
26: Aspen Olmsted – Computer Science Graduate School, The University of Charleston; '''Test on ACM Code of Ethics'''
Changed lines 90-91 from:
** Jasmine Randolph
to:
** Jasmine Randolph, Erick Delp, Ariel Robinson
Changed lines 99-100 from:
** Michael Eskew, Stephanie Allen
to:
** Michael Eskew, Stephanie Allen, Robert Chernek
Changed line 105 from:
** Johnny Bello-Ogunu, Alex Wray
to:
** Johnny Bello-Ogunu, Alex Wray, Zachary Roy
Changed lines 71-72 from:
to:
** Austin Hunt, Jayse White
Changed lines 78-79 from:
to:
** Doug Corrigan
Changed lines 81-82 from:
to:
** Tyler Newman, Liming Ding
Changed lines 86-87 from:
to:
** Phillip Wilson, Morgan Green, Ethan Hendrix
Changed lines 89-90 from:
to:
** Jasmine Randolph
Changed lines 92-93 from:
to:
** Sabrina Warner, Sumer Abdulaal, Asa Perryman
Changed lines 95-96 from:
to:
** Athina Lambrinos, Jo Culbertson, Justin Hull
Changed lines 98-99 from:
to:
** Michael Eskew, Stephanie Allen
Changed lines 101-102 from:
to:
** Drew Bigelow, Joseph Ayers
Added line 104:
** Johnny Bello-Ogunu, Alex Wray
Changed lines 116-117 from:
To receive a passing grade for the course, you must average a passing grade on each of the following: assignments, tests, and final exam.
to:
To receive a passing grade for the course, you must average a passing grade on each of the following: class participation in research talks, etc., test, presentation, and final paper.
Changed line 120 from:
'''Final Grade Computation:''' Class Participation in Research Talks (13 total) 55%, Test (1) 5%, Presentation on legal, ethical or social aspects of Research Talk (1) 20%, Final Paper 20%.\\
to:
'''Final Grade Computation:''' Class Participation in Research Talks (13 total), etc. 55%, Test (1) 5%, Presentation on legal, ethical or social aspects of Research Talk (1) 20%, Final Paper 20%.\\
Changed lines 68-69 from:
* January 17: Test; Discussion on readings; Topic/presentation day selection
to:
* January 17: Presentation and discussion on readings; Topic/presentation day selection
Changed line 74 from:
* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science Lab, The College of Charleston; '''Test on ACM Code of Ethics'''
Changed line 80 from:
* February 26: Aspen Olmsted – Data Engineering Lab, The College of Charleston
to:
* February 26: Aspen Olmsted – Computer Science Graduate School, The University of Charleston
Changed line 94 from:
* April 23: Aspen Olmsted – Graduate School, The University of Charleston
to:
* April 23: Sebastian van Delden, Robotics Lab, The College of Charleston
Changed line 101 from:
* The course features 13 research presentations from professors and professionals from various universities, companies, and the College of Charleston. Attending these presentations are required. Attendance is taken at the beginning of class.
to:
* The course features 13 research presentations from professors and professionals from various universities, companies, and the College of Charleston. Attending these presentations is required. Attendance is taken at the beginning of class.
Changed lines 2-3 from:
||![-College of Charleston-] ||! [-Jan. 7, 2018-]||
to:
||![-College of Charleston-] ||! [-Jan. 8, 2018-]||
Changed lines 64-89 from:
* January 8 Course overview; research day

* January 15 MLK Holiday, no class

* January 17 Test; Discussion on readings; Topic/presentation day selection

* January 22: Anthony Leclerc – ELP Solver; Ayman Hajja, healthcare informatics

* January 29: Jim Bowring CIRDLES Lab

* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science

* February 12: William Bares – MoCap
Lab

* February 19: Brent Munsell – ML/Image Analysis
Lab

* February 26: Aspen Olmsted Data Engineering Lab

* March 5: Xenia Mountrouidou – Cyber Security

* March 12: Malek Ben Salem, Accenture Labs, Arlington, VA

* March 26: Marian Mazzone, Artificial Intelligence and the Creative Landscape

* April 2: Bill Manaris
, Acoustics/Music Lab
to:
* January 8: Course overview; research day

* January 15: MLK Holiday, no class

* January 17: Test; Discussion on readings; Topic/presentation day selection

* January 22: Anthony Leclerc – ELP Solver; Ayman Hajja – Healthcare informatics, The College of Charleston

* January 29: Jim Bowring – CIRDLES Lab, The College of Charleston

* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science
Lab, The College of Charleston

* February 12: William Bares – MoCap
Lab, The College of Charleston

* February 19: Brent Munsell – ML/Image Analysis Lab, The College of Charleston

* February 26: Aspen Olmsted – Data Engineering Lab, The College of Charleston

* March 5: Xenia Mountrouidou – Cyber Security Lab
, The College of Charleston

* March 12: Malek Ben Salem – Cyber Security, Accenture Labs, Arlington, VA

* March 26: Marian Mazzone – Artificial Intelligence and the Creative Landscape, Modern and Contemporary Art, The College of Charleston

* April 2: Bill Manaris, Computer music and interaction, Acoustics and Music
Lab, The College of Charleston
Changed lines 94-96 from:
* April 23: Aspen Olmsted – Graduate School
to:
* April 23: Aspen Olmsted – Graduate School, The University of Charleston
Changed line 97 from:
'''Grading:'''
to:
'''Course Details:'''
Changed lines 99-104 from:
To receive a passing grade for the course, you must average a passing grade on each of the following: assignments, tests, and final exam.\\

'''Scale:''' A: 90-100; B+: 85-89; B: 80-84; C+: 75-79; C: 70-74; D+: 65-69; D: 60-64; F: 0-59.

'''Final Grade Computation:''' Assignments (4-6) 30%, Tests (2) 40%, Final Project 10%
, and Class Participation 20%.\\
to:
This course has the following arrangements:

* The
course features 13 research presentations from professors and professionals from various universities, companies, and the College of Charleston. Attending these presentations are required. Attendance is taken at the beginning of class.

* Each student in the class will need to research either the ethical
, legal, or social implications of (or related to) one of the speaker’s research ahead of time. The research speakers present during the Monday class. During the following Wednesday class, the (2 or 3) students who have been assigned to that person must present their findings:

** Each student presentation should be 15 minutes, interactive and thought-provoking with the other students. You must ask the audience at least 2 questions (for collective exploration / discussion) during your presentation.

** At least one peer-reviewed, published article must be found/referenced that supports/guides the presentation. More details will be provided.

** Presentation topic and peer-reviewed article must be approved by the instructor. The PDFs of all peer-reviewed articles must be sent to the instructor ahead of time. More details will be provided.

* By the end of the semester, students should submit a paper on their ethical, legal, or social topic that references several peer-review articles. Local and global impacts of their topic must be discussed in the paper. More details will be provided.
Changed line 114 from:
'''Test Policies:'''
to:
'''Grading:'''
Added lines 116-124:
To receive a passing grade for the course, you must average a passing grade on each of the following: assignments, tests, and final exam.

'''Scale:''' A: 90-100; B+: 85-89; B: 80-84; C+: 75-79; C: 70-74; D+: 65-69; D: 60-64; F: 0-59.

'''Final Grade Computation:''' Class Participation in Research Talks (13 total) 55%, Test (1) 5%, Presentation on legal, ethical or social aspects of Research Talk (1) 20%, Final Paper 20%.\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Test Policies:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
Changed lines 182-188 from:
Students can find the complete Honor Code and all related processes in the [[http://studentaffairs.cofc.edu/honor-system/studenthandbook/index.php | Student Handbook]].\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Late Policy:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* You have '''four "late" days''' for the whole semester. You may use these days as you wish for assignment submission. If you use them up, no late assignments will be accepted.
* '''If you submit everything on time''' (i.e., use no late days), you will earn an additional '''2.5 bonus points''' on your course grade.
to:
Students can find the complete Honor Code and all related processes in the [[http://studentaffairs.cofc.edu/honor-system/studenthandbook/index.php | Student Handbook]].
Changed lines 62-63 from:

Here
is a preliminary schedule of talks for the semester. It is subject to change.
to:
This is a preliminary schedule of talks for the semester. It is subject to change.

* January 8 Course overview; research day

* January 15 MLK Holiday, no class

* January 17 Test; Discussion on readings; Topic/presentation day selection
Deleted line 58:
Changed line 60 from:
'''Tentative Schedule (Subject to Change):'''
to:
'''Tentative Schedule:'''
Added lines 62-63:

Here is a preliminary schedule of talks for the semester. It is subject to change.
Changed line 61 from:
'''Tentative Outline:'''
to:
'''Tentative Schedule (Subject to Change):'''
Changed lines 63-65 from:
This course will introduce computer programming and music through the study, transcription, and creation of musical works. Music topics may include notation, scales, key signatures, intervals, chord construction, sight-singing, ear training, and readings in music history and aesthetics. Computing topics include data types, variables, assignment, selection, iteration, lists, functions, classes, events, and graphical user interfaces. Students will experience the computer as a musical instrument and a creative environment to develop fluency with musical practices, such as algorithmic composition, developing simple computer instruments, electroacoustic music, and minimalism.

The above outline is tentative; some topics may be added, others subtracted, as interest suggests and time permits.
to:

* January 22: Anthony Leclerc – ELP Solver; Ayman Hajja, healthcare informatics

* January 29: Jim Bowring CIRDLES Lab

* February 5: Paul Anderson – Data Science

* February 12: William Bares – MoCap Lab

* February 19: Brent Munsell – ML/Image Analysis Lab

* February 26: Aspen Olmsted Data Engineering Lab

* March 5: Xenia Mountrouidou – Cyber Security

* March 12: Malek Ben Salem, Accenture Labs, Arlington, VA

* March 26: Marian Mazzone, Artificial Intelligence and the Creative Landscape

* April 2: Bill Manaris, Acoustics/Music Lab

* April 9: Annie N. Simpson and Katie Kirchoff, Healthcare Leadership and Management, MUSC

* April 16: Panayiotis Kokoras, Experimental Music and Intermedia, University of North Texas

* April 23: Aspen Olmsted – Graduate School
Changed lines 26-27 from:
Other hours available by appointment.
to:
Other hours available by appointment.\\
Changed line 31 from:
A seminar course to prepare majors for careers in CS by discussing and studying professional, ethical, legal, and social issues and responsibilities in computing. Local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society will also be addressed. Oral presentations and written work will be required.
to:
A seminar course to prepare majors for careers in CS by discussing and studying professional, ethical, legal, and social issues and responsibilities in computing. Local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society will also be addressed. Oral presentations and written work will be required.\\
Changed line 31 from:
A course introducing the creative side of computing in the context of music, sounds, images, and other digital artifacts. Emphasis will be given to computer programming for music making, live performance, and interaction. Students will develop several digital artifacts and elementary musical compositions.
to:
A seminar course to prepare majors for careers in CS by discussing and studying professional, ethical, legal, and social issues and responsibilities in computing. Local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society will also be addressed. Oral presentations and written work will be required.
Deleted line 46:
Changed line 48 from:
'''Tentative Outline:'''
to:
'''Learning Outcomes:'''
Added lines 50-62:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will:

* Understand the main premises of major theories of ethics.
* Explain professional, ethical, legal, and social issues and responsibilities in computing.
* Explain the importance of security and privacy in computing.
* Analyze the impact of computing on individuals and society.
* Explain the need for engaging in continuous professional development.
* Make oral presentations on assigned ethical, legal or social issues.\\


(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Tentative Outline:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
Deleted lines 66-82:

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Learning Outcomes:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* Understand the fundamentals of music theory.
* Analyze music and create musical studies modeled on pre-existing works.
* Perform rhythmic patterns and sing melodies.
* Understand important developments in musical styles in the twentieth century and the present.
* Apply numeric and string data types to represent information.
* Use variables in program development.
* Understand arithmetic operators and use them to design expressions.
* Understand for-loops and use them to design processes involving repetition.
* Understand if statements and use them to design processes involving selection.
* Understand functions and use them to design processes involving modularization.
* Use predefined classes in program development (object-based programming).
* Understand events and graphical user interfaces and use them to develop simple computer-based instruments for electroacoustic music.
* Learn basic principles for group collaboration.\\
Changed line 39 from:
'''Tentative Outline:'''
to:
'''Textbook:'''
Changed lines 41-44 from:
This course will introduce computer programming and music through the study, transcription, and creation of musical works. Music topics may include notation, scales, key signatures, intervals, chord construction, sight-singing, ear training, and readings in music history and aesthetics. Computing topics include data types, variables, assignment, selection, iteration, lists, functions, classes, events, and graphical user interfaces. Students will experience the computer as a musical instrument and a creative environment to develop fluency with musical practices, such as algorithmic composition, developing simple computer instruments, electroacoustic music, and minimalism.

The above outline is tentative; some topics may be added, others subtracted, as interest suggests and time permits.
to:
None.
Changed line 43 from:
'''Textbook:'''
to:
'''References:'''
Changed lines 45-47 from:
* B. Manaris and A. Brown, ''[[http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439867914 | Making Music with Computers: Creative Programming in Python]]'', Chapman & Hall/CRC Textbooks in Computing, May 2014.
to:
Reading materials will provided via handouts, email, and the class website.\\
Changed line 49 from:
'''References:'''
to:
'''Tentative Outline:'''
Changed lines 51-54 from:
* [[http://jythonmusic.org | Jython Music]] website.
* A. Surmani, et al., ''[[http://www
.amazon.com/Essentials-Complete-Training-Workbook/dp/0882848976 | Alfred's Essentials of Music Theory]]'', Alfred Music, June 1999.

Additional reading materials will provided via handouts and the class website
.\\
to:
This course will introduce computer programming and music through the study, transcription, and creation of musical works. Music topics may include notation, scales, key signatures, intervals, chord construction, sight-singing, ear training, and readings in music history and aesthetics. Computing topics include data types, variables, assignment, selection, iteration, lists, functions, classes, events, and graphical user interfaces. Students will experience the computer as a musical instrument and a creative environment to develop fluency with musical practices, such as algorithmic composition, developing simple computer instruments, electroacoustic music, and minimalism.

The above outline is tentative; some topics may be added, others subtracted, as interest suggests and time permits.
Changed line 36 from:
* CSCI 221 with a C- or better\\
to:
CSCI 221 with a C- or better\\
Added lines 1-150:
|| border=0 width=100%
||![-College of Charleston-] ||! [-Jan. 7, 2018-]||

!!%center%CSCI 392 - Seminar on Computing and Society
!!!%center%Course Syllabus

(:table border=0 width=100%:)

(:cell width=20% align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Professor:'''
(:cell width=80% style='padding:5px;':)
Dr. Bill Manaris\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Office:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
Room: 326 Harbor Walk East Building \\
Phone: (95)3-8159 \\
E-mail: manarisb@cofc.edu \\
Web: http://manaris.org\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Office Hours:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
MWF, 11:30am-12:30pm\\
Other hours available by appointment.

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Course Description:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
A course introducing the creative side of computing in the context of music, sounds, images, and other digital artifacts. Emphasis will be given to computer programming for music making, live performance, and interaction. Students will develop several digital artifacts and elementary musical compositions.

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Prerequisites:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* CSCI 221 with a C- or better\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Tentative Outline:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
This course will introduce computer programming and music through the study, transcription, and creation of musical works. Music topics may include notation, scales, key signatures, intervals, chord construction, sight-singing, ear training, and readings in music history and aesthetics. Computing topics include data types, variables, assignment, selection, iteration, lists, functions, classes, events, and graphical user interfaces. Students will experience the computer as a musical instrument and a creative environment to develop fluency with musical practices, such as algorithmic composition, developing simple computer instruments, electroacoustic music, and minimalism.

The above outline is tentative; some topics may be added, others subtracted, as interest suggests and time permits.

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Textbook:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* B. Manaris and A. Brown, ''[[http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439867914 | Making Music with Computers: Creative Programming in Python]]'', Chapman & Hall/CRC Textbooks in Computing, May 2014.
(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''References:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* [[http://jythonmusic.org | Jython Music]] website.
* A. Surmani, et al., ''[[http://www.amazon.com/Essentials-Complete-Training-Workbook/dp/0882848976 | Alfred's Essentials of Music Theory]]'', Alfred Music, June 1999.

Additional reading materials will provided via handouts and the class website.\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Learning Outcomes:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* Understand the fundamentals of music theory.
* Analyze music and create musical studies modeled on pre-existing works.
* Perform rhythmic patterns and sing melodies.
* Understand important developments in musical styles in the twentieth century and the present.
* Apply numeric and string data types to represent information.
* Use variables in program development.
* Understand arithmetic operators and use them to design expressions.
* Understand for-loops and use them to design processes involving repetition.
* Understand if statements and use them to design processes involving selection.
* Understand functions and use them to design processes involving modularization.
* Use predefined classes in program development (object-based programming).
* Understand events and graphical user interfaces and use them to develop simple computer-based instruments for electroacoustic music.
* Learn basic principles for group collaboration.\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Grading:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
To receive a passing grade for the course, you must average a passing grade on each of the following: assignments, tests, and final exam.\\

'''Scale:''' A: 90-100; B+: 85-89; B: 80-84; C+: 75-79; C: 70-74; D+: 65-69; D: 60-64; F: 0-59.

'''Final Grade Computation:''' Assignments (4-6) 30%, Tests (2) 40%, Final Project 10%, and Class Participation 20%.\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Test Policies:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* Attendance at tests is mandatory. You must complete tests with no discussion or sharing of information with other students.
* Calculators, computers, cell phones, etc. may not be used during a test, unless otherwise directed.\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Classroom Policies:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* You are expected to attend all classes, and be in class on-time. '''If you accumulate 4 or more absences, you may be given a 'WA' grade'''.
** If you miss class, you must [[http://studentaffairs.cofc.edu/about/services/absence.php | fill out Absence Memo Request Form]] from the Absence Memo Office.
** If you miss class, you are responsible for announcements made in class, assignment due dates, etc.

* You are expected to take good notes during lecture.
* You should '''turn off all electronic devices''' (e.g., cell phones, etc.).

* Use a regular notebook (pen and paper) for note-taking. Studies show that taking notes in longhand (as opposed to laptop, etc.) results in higher grades. Studies also show that use of computers in class invites multi-tasking behavior (e.g., checking email, facebook, instant messaging, etc.). Time spent in such behavior is underestimated by students; also impact of such behavior is underestimated by students - i.e., such students earn lower grades; this also affects other students who have direct view of students using laptops - they also earn lower grades. Therefore, '''computers are not allowed for note taking'''. You must use computers only as directed in class. Outside of class, you may use computers as you wish. Also, note-taking may involve drawing and other diagrams, which cannot be captured well by computer - only by longhand. So, use a regular notebook (pen and paper) for note-taking. \\
\\
Here is the relevant research ('''read the first two articles''', for grade):

** Cindi May, "[[https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/students-are-better-off-without-a-laptop-in-the-classroom/ | Students are Better Off without a Laptop in the Classroom]]", Scientific American, Jul. 2017.
** Cindi May, "[[https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/a-learning-secret-don-t-take-notes-with-a-laptop/ | A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop]]", Scientific American, Jun. 2014.

** Pam A. Mueller and Daniel M. Oppenheimer, "[[https://sites.udel.edu/victorp/files/2010/11/Psychological-Science-2014-Mueller-0956797614524581-1u0h0yu.pdf | The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking]]", Psychological Science, vol. 25(6), pp. 1159-1168, 2014.
** Susan Payne Carter, Kyle Greenberg, Michael Walker, "[[http://seii.mit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/SEII-Discussion-Paper-2016.02-Payne-Carter-Greenberg-and-Walker-2.pdf | The Impact of Computer Usage on Academic Performance: Evidence from a Randomized Trial at the United States Military Academy]]", SEII Discussion Paper #2016.02, May 2016.
**Susan M. Ravizza, Mitchell G. Uitvlugt, Kimberly M. Fenn, "[[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28182528 | Logged In and Zoned Out]]", Psychological Science, vol. 28(2), pp. 171-180, Dec. 2016.
** Gloria Mark, Shamsi T. Iqbal, Mary Czerwinski, and Paul Johns, "[[http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2557204 | Bored mondays and focused afternoons: the rhythm of attention and online activity in the workplace]]", Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '14), ACM, New York, NY, USA, pp. 3025–3034, 2014.
** Dennis E. Clayson, Debra A. Haley, "[[http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0273475312467339 | An Introduction to Multitasking and Texting - Prevalence and Impact on Grades and GPA]]", Journal of Marketing Education, vol. 35(1), pp. 26-40, Dec. 2012.
** James M. Kraushaar and David Novak, "[[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/234074902_Examining_the_Effects_of_Student_Multitasking_with_Laptops_during_the_Lecture | Examining the Effects of Student Multitasking with Laptops during the Lecture]]", Journal of Information Systems Education, Vol. 21(2), pp. 241-251, Jul. 2010.
** Tracii Ryan, Andrea Chester, John Reece, and Sophia Xenos, "[[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4189307/ | The uses and abuses of Facebook: A review of Facebook addiction]]", Journal of Behavioral Addictions, vol. 3(3), pp. 133-148, 2014.
** Faria Sana, TinaWeston, Nicholas J. Cepeda, "[[http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360131512002254 | Laptop multitasking hinders classroom learning for both users and nearby peers]]", Computers & Education, vol. 62, pp. 24-31, Mar. 2013.

* You are expected to participate in class with questions and invited discussion.
* You are expected to do your own work during class activities, exercises, and assignments.
* Any student who feels he or she may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me individually to discuss your specific needs. Also, please contact the [[http://disabilityservices.cofc.edu// | Center for Disability Services]] for additional help.
* In summary, you should contribute positively to the classroom learning experience, and respect your classmates right to learn (see College of Charleston '''[[http://studentaffairs.cofc.edu/honor-system/studenthandbook/index.php | Student Handbook]]''', section on ''Classroom Code of Conduct'' (p. 58)).\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Assignment Policies:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* Assignment grades will be based on creative inspiration, design, style, and correctness of result.
* Assignments may NOT be submitted via email.
* Submission instructions will be provided for each assignment.\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Honor Code:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* '''You must do your assignments alone''' (or with your teammates, for group assignments).
* You are not allowed to discuss assignments and possible solutions with any person other than the instructor (or with your teammates, for group assignments). Any violation of these rules is an honor offense.
* On assignments you will be asked to identify the person(s) you received help from, if any.\\
\\

* Lying, cheating, attempted cheating, and plagiarism are violations of our Honor Code that, when suspected, are investigated. Each incident will be examined to determine the degree of deception involved.\\
\\
Incidents where the instructor determines the student’s actions are related more to a misunderstanding will be handled by the instructor. A written intervention designed to help prevent the student from repeating the error will be given to the student. The intervention, submitted by form and signed both by the instructor and the student, will be forwarded to the Dean of Students and placed in the student’s file.\\
\\
Cases of suspected academic dishonesty will be reported directly by the instructor and/or others having knowledge of the incident to the Dean of Students. A student found responsible by the Honor Board for academic dishonesty will receive a XXF in the course, indicating failure of the course due to academic dishonesty. This status indicator will appear on the student’s transcript for two years after which the student may petition for the XX to be expunged. The F is permanent.\\
\\
Students should be aware that unauthorized collaboration--working together without permission-- is a form of cheating. Research conducted and/or papers written for other classes cannot be used in whole or in part for any assignment in this class without obtaining prior permission from the instructor.\\
\\
Students can find the complete Honor Code and all related processes in the [[http://studentaffairs.cofc.edu/honor-system/studenthandbook/index.php | Student Handbook]].\\

(:cellnr valign=top align=right style='padding:5px;':)
'''Late Policy:'''
(:cell style='padding:5px;':)
* You have '''four "late" days''' for the whole semester. You may use these days as you wish for assignment submission. If you use them up, no late assignments will be accepted.
* '''If you submit everything on time''' (i.e., use no late days), you will earn an additional '''2.5 bonus points''' on your course grade.
(:tableend:)