Fall2012.CSIS672 History

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  • Final: 7:30-10:30pm, Monday, Dec. 10, 2012
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  • Final: 5:30-8:30pm, Monday, Dec. 10, 2012
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  • Wingfield, N. (2012), "Fresh Windows, but Where’s the Start Button?", NY Times, Oct. 22, 2012.
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  • Test 1: Monday, Oct. 10
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  • Test 1: Monday, Oct. 8
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  • Test 1: TBA
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  • Test 1: Monday, Oct. 10
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  • Final: 7:30-10:30pm, Monday, December 10, 2012
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  • Final: 7:30-10:30pm, Monday, Dec. 10, 2012
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  • Intro to Python
    • Magnus Lie Hetland, Instant Hacking in Python (for non-programmers) and Instant Python (for programmers).
    • John Zelle, Teaching Computer Science with Python transparencies: one slide per page and four slides per page (PDF).
    • Jeffrey Elkner, Allen B. Downey and Chris Meyers (2008), "How to Think Like a Computer Scientist - Learning with Python)", 2nd ed., The Open Book Project.
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TBA

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  • Student wiki for lecture notes (requires password, opens new window)
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  • Student wiki for lecture notes (requires password, opens new window)
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  • Color scheme designer for user interfaces.
  • 6 tips for designing Web Interfaces.
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  • Yahoo! Design Pattern Library
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  • Wikipedia, Fitt's Law, Hick's Law, and Power Law of Practice.
  • Color wheel for user interface design.
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  • Wikipedia, Fitt's Law, Hick's Law, and Power Law of Practice.
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Assignments

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Assignments / Projects

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Readings

  • Spolsky, J. (2001), User Interface Design for Programmers, on-line version of book published by Apress – Springer-Verlag, ISBN: 1893115941.
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References

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  • B. Manaris, V. MacGyvers, and M. Lagoudakis, "A Listening Keyboard for Users with Motor Impairments—A Usability Study," International Journal of Speech Technology 5(4), pp. 371-388, Dec. 2002. (This usability study shows that speech interaction with an ideal listening keyboard is better for users with permanent or task-induced motor impairments than conventional modes for alphanumeric input (37% better task completion time; 74% better typing rate; 63% better error rate). Results are shown relevent to alphanumeric input on mobile devices, such as PDAs, cellular phones, and personal organizers.)
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  • B. Manaris, V. MacGyvers, and M. Lagoudakis, "A Listening Keyboard for Users with Motor Impairments—A Usability Study," International Journal of Speech Technology 5(4), pp. 371-388, Dec. 2002. (This usability study shows that speech interaction with an ideal listening keyboard is better for users with permanent or task-induced motor impairments than conventional modes for alphanumeric input (37% better task completion time; 74% better typing rate; 63% better error rate). Results are shown relevent to alphanumeric input on mobile devices, such as PDAs, cellular phones, and personal organizers.)
Deleted lines 55-85:
  • Kay, A. "The Early History of Smalltalk", ACM SIGPLAN Notices, Volume 28, Number 3, March 1993.

References

  • The usability of Unix and C?.
  • Quotes on simplicity.
  • Pyro Robotics, Evolutionary Algorithms module.
  • The (bad) design of everyday things:
    • When designers ignore consumers, products can flop (Konica e-mini M digital camera and MP3 player).
    • BMW iDrive -- what is created for the sake of simplicity can oftentimes create the most confusion. (hear NPR's All Things Considered Δ, Thursday, August 8, 2002; 8 mins)
  • Examples of innovative, well-designed UIs:
    • Weka Explorer screenshots -- task-driven UI design.
    • Dasher -- let your eyes do the typing
    • TextArc is an innovative user interface presents an alternative to linear reading.
    • CSS Zen Garden -- a demonstration of what can be accomplished visually through CSS-based design.
  • Alternative UI paradigms:
    • Multi-Touch Interaction - bi-manual, multi-point, and multi-user interactions on a graphical interaction surface.
    • Sound-based "touch-screen" technology - inexpensive interaction via detection of sound waves produced when solid objects are tapped.
    • Pressure-sensitive floor tiles - users interact intuitively and naturally with the environment and with each other.
    • Bodypad game controller actuated by the body.
    • Exergames.com/ - moving your body into the game (various UIs).
  • Icon design project
  • Usability Forum, User Centered - Thoughts on usability in everyday things, blog.
Deleted lines 56-57:
  • NASA JPL Object Oriented Data Technology: user interface evaluation of web programming toolkits. (Also, see this small example? of the approach applied to Java and Python.)
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  1. Debbie Stone, et al. (2005), User Interface Design and Evaluation, Morgan Kaufmann.
  2. Donald A. Norman (2002), The Design of Everyday Things, Basic Books.
  3. Saul Greenberg, et al. (2011), Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook, Morgan Kaufmann.
to:
  1. Debbie Stone, et al. (2005), "User Interface Design and Evaluation", Morgan Kaufmann.
  2. Donald A. Norman (2002), "The Design of Everyday Things", Basic Books.
  3. Saul Greenberg, et al. (2011), Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook", Morgan Kaufmann.
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Human Computer Interaction

When/Where

Section 1: M 5:30-8:30PM / NCC 140

Description

Introduction to human computer interaction and user interface development. Topics include definitions of Human-Computer Interaction, importance of good interfaces, psychological foundations, user-interface design examples, interaction models and dialog types for interfaces, user interface life-cycle, user-centered design and task-analysis, prototyping and the iterative design cycle, prototyping tools and environments, user interface implementation, and interface quality and methods of evaluation.

This course stresses the importance of good interfaces and the relationship of user interface design to human-computer interaction. It is intended to provide an adequate basis in software design and implementation for user interfaces. There will be content on both the issues and engineering process for user interface development.

Prerequisites: Each student must have completed CSCI 230 (Data Structures and Algorithms) or an equivalent or higher course, or have permission of the instructor. Minimally, each student should have strong background in software development, data structures, and algorithms; also strong background in a high-level programming language such as Python, Java, or C/C++.

Test Dates

  • Test 1: TBA
  • Test 2: TBA
  • Final: 7:30-10:30pm, Monday, December 10, 2012

Assignments

TBA

Textbooks

  1. Debbie Stone, et al. (2005), User Interface Design and Evaluation, Morgan Kaufmann.
  2. Donald A. Norman (2002), The Design of Everyday Things, Basic Books.
  3. Saul Greenberg, et al. (2011), Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook, Morgan Kaufmann.

Readings

  • Spolsky, J. (2001), User Interface Design for Programmers, on-line version of book published by Apress – Springer-Verlag, ISBN: 1893115941.
  • Lewis, C. and Rieman, J. (1994), Task-Centered User Interface Design - A Practical Introduction.
  • Jacob Nielsen's usability pointers
    • Usability 101 -- How to define usability? How, when, and where can you improve it? Why should you care? This overview answers these basic questions.
    • Ten Usability Heuristics -- Ten general principles for user interface design.
    • Progressive disclosure defers advanced or rarely used features to a secondary screen, making applications easier to learn and less error-prone, whereas staged disclosure provides a linear sequence of options, with a subset displayed at each step. Both are strategies to manage the profusion of features and options in modern user interfaces.
  • Pogue, D., "Some Phones Are Just, Well, Phones?", New York Times, September 28, 2006.
  • Critchley, S., "Designing Musical Instruments for Flow", O'Reilly Digital Media, December 29, 2004. (If you ask musicians what they value most about making music, most of them will say — in some form or another — flow. Flow is that wonderful sense of being lost in your work, when "work" becomes joy. Time disappears, and so do distraction, anxiety, and just about everything else, yielding to a pure unity of creator and creation. So wouldn't it be strange if many of today's musical instruments were designed to prevent or destroy flow?)
  • B. Manaris, V. MacGyvers, and M. Lagoudakis, "A Listening Keyboard for Users with Motor Impairments—A Usability Study," International Journal of Speech Technology 5(4), pp. 371-388, Dec. 2002. (This usability study shows that speech interaction with an ideal listening keyboard is better for users with permanent or task-induced motor impairments than conventional modes for alphanumeric input (37% better task completion time; 74% better typing rate; 63% better error rate). Results are shown relevent to alphanumeric input on mobile devices, such as PDAs, cellular phones, and personal organizers.)
  • Paper prototypes
    • Snyder, C. (2001) Paper prototyping. IBM developerWorks.
    • Nielsen, J. (2003) Paper Prototyping: Getting User Data Before You Code.
  • Wikipedia, Fitt's Law, Hick's Law, and Power Law of Practice.
  • Kay, A. "The Early History of Smalltalk", ACM SIGPLAN Notices, Volume 28, Number 3, March 1993.

References

  • The usability of Unix and C?.
  • Quotes on simplicity.
  • Pyro Robotics, Evolutionary Algorithms module.
  • The (bad) design of everyday things:
    • When designers ignore consumers, products can flop (Konica e-mini M digital camera and MP3 player).
    • BMW iDrive -- what is created for the sake of simplicity can oftentimes create the most confusion. (hear NPR's All Things Considered Δ, Thursday, August 8, 2002; 8 mins)
  • Examples of innovative, well-designed UIs:
    • Weka Explorer screenshots -- task-driven UI design.
    • Dasher -- let your eyes do the typing
    • TextArc is an innovative user interface presents an alternative to linear reading.
    • CSS Zen Garden -- a demonstration of what can be accomplished visually through CSS-based design.
  • Alternative UI paradigms:
    • Multi-Touch Interaction - bi-manual, multi-point, and multi-user interactions on a graphical interaction surface.
    • Sound-based "touch-screen" technology - inexpensive interaction via detection of sound waves produced when solid objects are tapped.
    • Pressure-sensitive floor tiles - users interact intuitively and naturally with the environment and with each other.
    • Bodypad game controller actuated by the body.
    • Exergames.com/ - moving your body into the game (various UIs).
  • Icon design project
  • Usability Forum, User Centered - Thoughts on usability in everyday things, blog.
  • Color wheel for user interface design.
  • NASA JPL Object Oriented Data Technology: user interface evaluation of web programming toolkits. (Also, see this small example? of the approach applied to Java and Python.)